Ushak

Ushak (2001)
BDes Textile Design final project, Shenkar College of Engineering and Design
Supervisors: Yeshiahu Gabbay, Yehudit Katz

Pile and Grass; Mixed media on digital C-prints

Ushak
In the project I investigated ageing and destruction of textiles. A 16th century medallion carpet from the town of Ushak in Turkey, served me as a model. Five hundred years which have passed through it’s dense knots, have left their sign, have eaten, worn out, scratched the wool, but the carpet has not vanished. Contrarily, the pile partially worn out only emphasizes the density of the survived. Holes and patches stress the complexity and fineness of patterns. This state has made visible the hidden qualities of the carpet. Those qualities were approaching animal hide and dry grass.

As the work progressed, I found movements similar in their character – the pile movement, the hair movement, the grass movement. Writing and engraving appeared close to them. Engraving revealed itself as a fascinating action, when signs appeared as a result of removing the material instead of adding it. Engraving brought after it another action, etching. Each of the actions has originated from the material, but at the same time, the material derived from the actions. Strangely, those actions, relatively distant from the conceptual source – the carpet – have brought an action close to it fearfully: the pile plucking.

In my work I have created a kind of laboratory, where the subjects have suffered, lost of their flesh, were refined and made thinner. I did not try to fake a natural process. I conducted research; choosing my instruments with strictness and referring to the results with a kind of scientific distancing, not rejecting the unexpected conclusions, but giving myself up to them, formulating them with all possible precision, as if phrasing a sentence or choosing words for a poem.

Yellow cloth; cotton/wool; industrially woven jacquards; felting; dyeing; devoure
Blue cloth

Red cloth

Remnants

Photography: Alex Kucherenko, Alex Lipkin, Boris Oicherman

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